Trigger Warning: This novel and review discuss the following: stalking, shootings, injustice, violence, death.

Goodreads Rating: 4 Stars

Review:

Constance Kopp is not messing around. After she and her sisters, Fleurette and Norma, we involved in a car versus carriage accident, Constance is determined to get justice and payment for the damages. However, the man that happened to hit them, Henry Kaufman, is a factory owner who doesn’t give a damn about courtesies or apologies. Constance makes the mistake of writing him, unintentionally giving the dangerous man their address and names. Soon, Kaufman and his gang of ne’er do-wells are throwing bricks through their windows, breaking into their home, and threatening their lives. He especially targets Fleurette, the youngest.

Constance and Norma will not let him intimidate them, and with the help of the local police, they press charges. One officer in particular, Sheriff Heath, takes it upon himself to teach the sisters how to shoot a revolver and assign deputies to guard duty to protect the women. However, Constance has a secret reason as to why she is determined to protect Fleurette and stop Kaufman… a reason that sent them to the countryside to live in isolation. However, the more further she pursues justice, the more the Kopp sisters are thrust into the spotlight- including making the paper headlines.

Set in New Jersey in 1914, the Kopp sisters, especially Constance, are by far considered modern women. They’re independent, strong, and fiercely protective. I loved hearing Moore’s spin on their individual voices, along with the excellent New York and New Jersey accents! Between Stewart’s snappy and creative writing techniques in using the newspaper headlines, and Christina Moore’s fantastic capture of the main character’s narration, I found myself absorbed in the modern yet historical fiction novel.

TL/DR: Girl Waits With Gun is a modern historical fiction novel about three sisters who will do everything to protect each other.

Read it? Yes!

Recommend it? Yes, but best for mature audiences.

Buy it? I probably would skip buying this one and just borrow a copy.

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